George Iordanou Politics, Philosophy and (not much) Real Life
Category

Articles in English

I still feel guilty for my indifference towards football

I have absolutely no interest in the World Cup. Until yesterday I didn’t even know which country was hosting it. My relationship with football is rather peculiar. When I was young I used to attend all the games of my local football club, OMONOIA Nicosia. Football in Cyprus is politicised and OMONOIA reflects my political views — it is supported by left wing working class people and it emerged as...

Mr Cameron: when you bully the EU you threaten one of the most productive groups in the British economy

David Cameron, the British Prime Minister, does not want Jean-Claude Juncker, the EPP Candidate, to become the next president of the European commission. I’m the last person to support an EPP candidate, but I’m also pissed off at David Cameron for threatening me all the time. My partner and I are European citizens, studying and working in the UK, paying taxes and national security contributions...

Orphanides in his paper on ‘What happened in Cyprus’ is being partisan

Professor Athanasios Orphanides published an article titled What Happened in Cyprus? The Economic Consequences of the Last Communist Government in Europe. You can find the MIT Sloan Research Paper that Professor Orphanides published on May 28th here. I include the abstract of the paper below: This paper reviews developments in the Cypriot economy following the introduction of the euro on 1...

Feeling vulnerable is breaking barriers

An entry from my diary: Thursday, May 29th, 2014 Two nights ago I found myself in a hotel with a terrible headache and a rising fever. I haven’t felt as vulnerable in a long while. Thankfully, I had E. with me, who was kind enough to run to the pharmacy and get some painkillers, which made things better. Two days later I’m still on painkillers. My nose is running, my chest is full of disgusting...

Labour needs a grand vision for Britain

However misguided the Tory vision of a future Britain might be, at least we know they have one. It is time for Labour to start thinking similarly. The numbers attest to this need: recent polls show the first Conservative lead in over two years and give Ed Miliband’s party its smallest share of the vote for four years. Ed Miliband has hired Obama’s former advisor David Axelrod to help him...

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

I’ve recently finished reading Haruki Murakami’s book on running. Murakami is so brilliant that even if he were to describe how to fix a fridge, you wouldn’t be able to leave the book to rest. One section of the book is about his one-man run from Athens to Marathon, when he attempted to complete the original Marathon race. He was only followed by a van with a photographer in it, charged with the...

In the second year of my PhD I started running – it’s amazing, you should try it

Who would have thought that a PhD in political philosophy is physically intensive? It was in the beginning of the second year that I started feeling weird pains in my lower back. A new chair didn’t help, neither did anything else, and being in my late twenties I couldn’t keep complaining — after all, complaining is an entitlement bestowed upon you with middle-age. So I had to do something...

Clean the Fridge

A video is being shared between my Greek-speaking Cypriot friends, showing an old woman who is, supposedly, the last person to leave Varosha during the Turkish invasion of 1974. Whilst watching the video I remembered a story that my late grandfather told me. His family and him were forced out of their home during the first phase of the Turkish invasion in 1974. Between the first and second...

Live Opera HD Streaming: it feels like eavesdropping and I would do it again

Last night we watched a live HD streaming of Puccini’s La Bohème from the Metropolitan Opera in New York. We watched it at Warwick Arts Centre. I didn’t enjoy the opera very much; it turns out that I am not a big Puccini fun. That is not to say that the performers and the three different stage sets were not amazing; I don’t think I’ve ever witnessed an overall spectacle that was as close to...

How Ebola turned into an epidemic. Smaller states, public health and pharmaceuticals

There is an outbreak of Ebola virus in Guinea. Ebola is found in isolated communities and it is so lethal that it kills 90% of those infected by it. Ebola virus was firstly identified in 1976, in the small village of Yambuku in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. For nearly forty years since then the international community has failed to dedicate considerable resources towards finding a cure...

Reducing the price of beer. Should taxation be used to change social attitudes?

Yesterday, the Chancellor of Exchequer, George Osborne, presented the budget for 2014. The big mantra was “hardworking people”—the state aims to protect and promote the interests of the “makers, doers and savers”. One of the measures he announced was that the beer duty will be lowered by 1p per pint. Admittedly this cut will not have a tremendous impact on most people—you need to drink 100 pints...

HOWTO survive social encounters with British people

Life in the UK is not always straightforward. One needs time to get accustomed to the social norms in order to be able to understand the subtle meanings that are implied in social encounters. I will attempt, through an array of generalisations and stereotypes, to illustrate these differences. Continue reading only if you don’t take yourself too seriously.

Eating to death and bad arguments against paying for NHS treatment; or, how injustice shapes our behaviour

Surely you must know the adverse effects of bad diet and no exercise. Why should the taxpayer pay for what is, ultimately, the exercise of your freedom of choice? This is the question that Jeremy Paxman asked the former NHS chief Sir David Nicholson, when Nicholson went to Newsnight to describe his transition from being the head of the NHS to becoming yet another NHS patient with diabetes.

Anyone who falls in love is searching for the missing pieces of themselves

I became really fond of Haruki Murakami’s work. I finished Norwegian Wood a couple of weeks ago and I am now halfway through Kafka on the Shore, where I came across this lovely quote. Enjoy. Anyone who falls in love is searching for the missing pieces of themselves. So anyone who’s in love gets sad when they think of their lover. It’s like stepping back inside a room you have...

George Iordanou Politics, Philosophy and (not much) Real Life

Your sidebar area is currently empty. Hurry up and add some widgets.